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Stevie Salas sums up his mind-blowing year!




Photo: Marc Mennigmann


This year has been a crazy year for me, with my film RUMBLE: The Indians who rocked the world opening, winning at the Sundance Festival and being showed at film festivals all over the world – and with the release of my first Gold record in a long time, Chubby Groove, which I made with Koshi Inaba.


Inaba/Salas with "Overdrive" off their hit album Chubby Groove (2017)


RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World - official trailer (2017). Stevie Salas was an executive producer for the film, which was directed by Catherine Bainbridge and Alfonso Maiorana.


It began with me producing tv in Canada in 2006, and a few years ago I started working on my film. 2017 has been a year of touring with the film since it opened, of speaking at my film, and of getting standing ovations and awards for it. HBO have bought it, and it’s on PBS and Amazon Prime. Simultaneously I have been working and touring with Koshi Inaba, who is the biggest ever selling artist in Japan, with over a hundred million records sold. He called me saying that he was uninspired and burnt out, and he asked me if I would come over and write some songs with him. So I flew over to Japan, and I started putting 80s styled funk-tracks together like I did when I lived in London as a kid. We recorded all over the world, and the album features Bernard Fowler and Taylor Hawkins. It was released in January and had sold Gold by March. We also played sold out-shows after that, and stadiums in the summer.


Classic Stevie Salas: "Start Again"


In 2018 I plan on writing for a new Stevie Salas album. I got a phone call from Warner Bros Europe. I might perhaps release something in a limited edition for cool radio stations etc. I am also working on a crime drama for television with Kevin Munroe.







In ways the entire situation with record companies in general, and with social media as something that needs to be figured out for promotional reasons, has me feeling uncreative. Mostly I feel really bad for young people. There is no artist development anymore. When I started out you could be creative and it was encouraged. Record companies developed artists. They would say ‘Take this money and go work with Thomas Dolby, and see what you come up with’. What kids put out now is what would have been demos back then. There is so much crap out there and you can’t wade through it all to get to the good stuff.


A classic combo of great musical chemistry: Stevie Salas and TM Stevens, kicking up a jam together


TM Stevens, whom I worked with a lot (and one of the artists who truly kicked off this platform, Musicians’ Corner) was a force of nature and an elite musician. He had the kind of career where you had to be a musician first to even walk in the room. When I made my first album Joey Ramone walked in the studio, Miles Davis walked in the studio, Bernie Worrell walked in the studio and played on the album. You had to be able to handle being in the same room with anyone and working with anyone, without any preparation. TM could play anything, and make it sound just right, and still make it sound like TM Stevens. That is true mastery. He played on my songs, such as "Tell Your Story Walking" , where TM’s bassline is huge



STEVIE SALAS, guitarist, tv- and film-producer, singer, song-writer, record producer, etc... and a world citizen, was once sleeping on the couch at the studio where he had gotten a job, when he suddenly was woken and found himself jamming with George Clinton, who was there to record, in the small hours of the morning. The rest, as they say, is history. Combining a successful solo-career with being a kickass guitarist to Mick Jagger, Rod Stewart, etc, Stevie Salas has a very long bio indeed. A few years ago he shared some of the memories in his book "When We Were the Boys: Coming of Age on Rod Stewart's Out of Order Tour", and since he has gone on to producing the most acclaimed music documentary to hit the screens in a long time.

FIND OUT MORE HERE!

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT "RUMBLE: THE MOVIE" HERE!


 CHUBBY GROOVE Inaba/Salas is available HERE


 "When We Were the Boys: Coming of Age on Rod Stewart's Out of Order Tour" by Stevie Salas with Robert Yehling is available HERE


 <3 TM Stevens <3 has contributed two articles to this platform, one of which is his information-packed filmed article "Straight Music Talk". Musicians' Corner and all of our friends are eternal fans of this amazing artist, and will always be humbly grateful for his insightful and generous contributions to this site.

Support TM Stevens: BUY TM STEVENS' MUSIC HERE




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Season's Greetings from T.M. Stevens!

 

 

  We have received a text from one of the amazing artists who got this site started!

  Bass legend T.M. Stevens contributed a film to Musicians' Corner in December 2013, and that really meant a lot to the development on this site. (Watch it below!)

  Today T.M. shares his thoughts on the year that is about to come to a close and his hopes for the one that is about to begin. And not only that. He also shows us a few pages from his photo album of his colleagues and friends.

  Enjoy!

 




" The music business has really changed, in that when I was playing music in the mid 80's and all throughout the 90's, I made a really good living, as the recording session business was really doing great, and the Musicians Union set how much we got paid to record. Some sessions were to overdub, but most of the sessions were playing with full bands and all together. Now and all through 2014, most of the music is all computerized samples and loops, and they don't use real musicians to record those songs, so the music these days sounds very robotic and with no soul.

What caught my ear, is last New Years Eve, I flew to Washington DC and played with the great Dr. John from New Orleans, and just by listening to his left hand on the keyboards, I played about 18 songs with no rehearsal and it rocked, and was all real music. "

 



Dr. John and T.M. Stevens

 

" A few weeks ago, I found out that a great friend of mine passed away, and he's a legendary bass player from the famous 60' band called “The Cream”. His name is Jack Bruce, and we both did a jam session together at the Warwick New York Shop, (as we both are Warwick endorsers), and even though it was two basses, it really rocked. "

Jack Bruce ~ , T.M. Stevens and Mordy Ferber

 

" I also miss Whitney Houston in music. I really miss her and her great talent. "

 

Whitney Houston ~ , ''So Emotional'' video with T.M. Stevens 

 

" For 2015, I pray with my heart and soul that REAL MUSIC WILL COME BACK, AND REAL MUSICIANS WILL PLAY TOGETHER AGAIN WITHOUT COMPUTERS AND LOOPS. Thank You Maria & Musicians' Corner..”T.M.” "

 



With Richie Kotzen, Will Calhoun

 



With Clarence Clemons ~ and band





With Stevie Wonder

 



With Bernie Worrell, DeWayne 'Blackbyrd' McKnight and Cindy Blackman-Santana

 


With Sheila E


 







 

 

 


 



With Doug Wimbish and Jeff Berlin



With Ricky Lawson ~

 



With Mfa Kera and band

 


With Larry Graham and Bootsy Collins

 


 

 



 

To watch T.M. Stevens 45 minute long film for Musicians' Corner, made in December 2013, and full of timeless and priceless information 

GO TO THE FILM ''STRAIGHT MUSIC TALK''

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10 artists on the changes and current times in the industry



  

  We are celebrating our first birthday here at Musicians’ Corner. This site, where musicians talk and write about music, opened at the turn of the month October-November last year. At that point the site was empty. But now…

 

  So many things have been said about music, as an art form, a soundtrack to our lives, a profession and career, as a reflection of us as people and a reflection of the times, and as an industry and a business, over this period of time. Many of our contributors have also addressed the same things, the changes in the business being one of the topics that many have spoken of, for example.

 


  Today we recap some of what has been said about the current times in music from an infrastructural point of view. Music has gone through so many changes lately in that regard.

 

 



KENT BEATTY: -It's a great time to be a musician. Some might disagree with that, in this age of TV Voice/Idol contests and live bands being replaced by machines all the time. Sure, record deals aren't being served up on the hood of a Ferrari often these days. But now there is so much that artists can do independently, if they are willing to put some work into it. Technology is a double-edged sword. More things to keep up with and manage, but most of the time, it is a musician's best friend. Imagine a tour without GPS. YouTube (and many others) allows anyone's music to be heard across the world, for free. And social media is far more effective than posting fliers around town. We take these useful tools for granted, some of which didn't even exist 10 years ago.

 



BRYAN BELLER: -Being totally open for communication 24/7/365 in this social media day and age has its pluses and minuses. I personally think it's a net positive to be able to have direct access to fans and vice versa - it can strengthen the bond between you and those who follow you, and it enables an artist to be much clearer about who they really are in "public". I've been online and available for public e-mail since 1995, and for many years I made a point to respond to *every* *single* *communication* that came my way. Nowadays that's just not possible anymore, because of the sheer volume of responses from Facebook, Twitter, and e-mail, for which I'm grateful - but I still try. That said, it can be a hindrance to the essential practice of isolation required for creativity. It's pretty hard to grow as a composer and a player when you're just writing e-mails all the time. So I think I'm finding a balance, and everyone needs to find their own.

 



SADIQ BEY: -Today the industry of music is in total disarray. And working musicians are professionals, so it’s a job.
There is something I call truth to ownership, against truth to power. Everybody is owned in music, in sports, in Hollywood. They make magic wands out of holly wood, ya know? And it’s about bucking and bowing to get jobs. If you don’t make your own label you’re screwed.

 



JEAN-PAUL BOURELLY: -The music business crashed with 9/11. We have been building it back up, to keep the creative minded audience in tune with us and music has still evolved.

 

 

LIGE CURRY: -I want to say to young musicians that they need to educate themselves. These days you can google any question. This is no joke. Some business deals are good, some business deals are bad. When you don’t update yourself you will find yourself in hot water. But try to keep a positive attitude. A lot of people can’t handle it. You have to treat the business side in a way so that it doesn’t take you out.

 



JAN KINCAID: -The business has changed so much over the years. The people who have survived are the people who have changed with it.

We have to look at new ways of doing our work. You are in charge of your own destiny much more now than you were before. It also means that you have to be careful where you spend your money.

We came up in the traditional way, through the live-scene and through people who wanted to invest in us. Now acts are molded to suit a certain age group. But then records cost less to make. For the people who grow up with this, for the 19-year olds now, the new way is what’s natural. We have been young enough to go with the changes. If we were ten years older I think that we would have been struggling. 

 

 


OZ NOY: - The music business crashed, and the same thing happened in New York too. It hit the city hard. New York is still the jazz center of the world, but the scene has changed. A lot of clubs have closed. And now it’s a pretty set reality. There is still good music, but a lot less of it in a lot less places. The only thing that got bigger is the Broadway shows. That’s great for Broadway but it’s not great for real music in my opinion cause Broadway is not music , its theater.




ANDREW STEEN: - The benefit of the major label-system was purely financial. They had time and effort to put into albums because there was money. The people contributing to a Pledge campaign want a return on their investment even if it's small. The majors wanted things to sell. People didn't represent themselves very well in that. You can release your home made music now and be judged on your own merit.

 

 

TM STEVENS: -Everything is machines, and it has really hurt the business, and hurt artists who play and have studied, and that’s what I have done all my entire career. But the answer to this is you don’t follow that and give up. Never give up. This is for the young people. Listen to me. Do not give up. Whatever it is that you believe in, whatever it is that you feel, follow your dreams and your dreams will follow you. – And I particularly believe that we will get our business back.

 

 

NIKO STOESSL: -I think that everything’s getting better though and that the music business will restructure itself again eventually, creating new sources of income for musicians who are willing to move forward.

 

 

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Remembering Bob Marley

Musicians' Corner's Quote section quotes artists talking about music, and listens to tunes


Saluting Bob Marley with the help of one of our contributors, T.M. Stevens.


Bob Marley, February 6, 1945 - May 11, 1981


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Bass-legend TM Stevens' exclusive documentary for Musicians' Corner
















Bass-legend+ T.M. Stevens has made a documentary for Musicians' Corner.






Presenting

T.M. STEVENS

STRAIGHT MUSIC TALK



TM Stevens shares his history and wisdom, in this inspiring documentary, which he has produced himself.

In this film T.M. talks about his work with many greats -- and takes the viewer back in time and around the world in his narrative. He plays a few of his famous basslines -- and gives a virtuoso's tips on bass-playing. He also shares exclusive footage -- as well as his views on music of yesteryears and today.




During his extensive career T.M. Stevens has worked with Narada Michael Walden, Miles Davis, James Brown, Nona Hendryx, Joe Cocker, Little Steven, Tina Turner, Billy Joel, Steve Vai, Stevie Salas and many, many more. T.M. Stevens has also been a member of The Pretenders and has an extensive solo career with nine solo-albums released to date. Mr. Stevens' bio is so long that it easily fills a few books, and he also does a lot of workshops and masterclasses inspiring the next generation of virtuoso players. Find out more at www.tmstevens.com



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