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Sam Barsh: - As a lead artist I would have to commit to a lifetime of touring


Sam Barsh

 An article with Sam Barsh

 

   Chicago is where I started playing. I was born there, and raised in a nearby town called Wilmette. Chicago is where I was exposed to jazz and jazz clubs. I was only interested in jazz back then and Chicago was my link to jazz.

 

   Getting a No 1 hit didn’t happen as early as it may seem, although I do hope to have a long career. I started out as a professional musician nineteen years ago. And a lot of things really didn’t go my way at times. You make so many things, and such a small percentage winds up on a record. A hit song represents not just that song, but so many other songs you created along the way. When I hear a hit, it makes me want to hear the music that didn’t make it on the record. Of course a hit song opens doors and gets you more opportunities, and to me that's the most important thing.

 

Aloe Blacc ''The Man''

 

 

   I met Avishai Cohen through Brian Killeen, a bassist I went to college with. I was already a big fan of his before I even moved out east. Avishai had started a rock band with some of my classmates, and they used to rehearse at our school in New Jersey. I was living in Brooklyn, so sometimes I’d drive him back to his place in New York and we got to know each other a bit.

 

 

   When Avishai wanted to start a trio with young musicians, Mark Guiliana recommended me to be in the band. I started working with him right after graduating university, so I didn’t have to get a job. Avishai Cohen is a great bandleader and a friend. It was a very special experience, and he allowed me to shine and do my thing. Not many bandleaders allow that.

 

 

   The live band / touring scene and the songwriting / production scene are different worlds. Live, you are seen as a side-musician. In the studio, you are seen as a writer. I've worked with people in live settings mainly through recommendations and reputation. Most of my work in the studio comes from personal relationships I have with producers, artists, and my publisher. In both settings, getting consistent work is based on personality and on being able to deliver. I'm comfortable in a lot of different situations, and am always willing to do what the leader wants, whether its a session or a gig.

 

 

 

Sam Barsh

   I prefer helping others shine to being the lead artist. Among the cons of being the lead artist are that you have the promotional responsibility. If a show isn’t well attended, it’s seen as your fault. You have to be comfortable talking about yourself. Some of it I don’t mind. Although you do get recognized, being a lead artist is a full-time job. In helping others create their sound and cultivate their artistic vision, I get to make a lot more music, and have a bigger output than I would otherwise have had. I toured so much in my 20’s, and I’m really ok with not traveling much. I enjoy LA. I have my friends here and sessions almost every day. It’s better for me to be in one place. I still travel a bit, but as a lead artist I would have to commit to a lifetime of touring.

 

Palter Ego ''Man In The Mirror'' cover

 

   Ten years ago I would never have thought of moving here (Los Angeles). But as my musical interests became more diverse, I realized that the things I wanted to do musically had shifted from New York to Los Angeles. The other genres aside from jazz thrive in LA, and there is a good jazz scene here too. It’s not as good as New York, but it’s good. My years in New York have affected the way I play and it gets me work here.

 

 

Sam Brash ''Wake Up And Smile''

 


Sam Barsh is a keyboardist and songwriter. He has written and produced songs for major label artists Norah Jones, Robin McKelle and Aloe Blacc, including the hit song "The Man", which Barsh co-wrote for Aloe Blacc. Barsh has released solo material as lead artist and with his band Palter Ego.

He has also performed with a diverse group of renowned artists, including: Avishai Cohen, Babyface, Bobby McFerrin, Branford Marsalis, Brenna Whitaker, Bruno Mars, Cassandra Wilson, Common, David Foster, Dontae Winslow, Emily King, Estelle, Fred Wesley, Gavin DeGraw, Gene Simmons, Gregory Porter, Je Parker (of Tortoise), John Robinson, Jojo, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Kiran Ahluwalia, Large Professor, Lonnie Plaxico, Mark Ballas, Maurice Brown, Maya Azucena, Mino Cinelu, Natasha Bedingeld, Quadron, Ravi Coltrane, Rez Abbasi, Robin Eubanks, Robin McKelle, Roy Hargrove, Stevie Wonder, The Brand New Heavies, The Mighty Blue Kings, The Spam All-Stars, Tom Jones, Wax, and Zach Brock.

Find out more HERE.

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Kris Bowers: - I don't really know who Kris Bowers is


Kris Bowers

 An article with Kris Bowers


   I don’t really know who Kris Bowers is. I am someone who is trying to be a musician.

   My parents got me started in music. They aren’t musicians, but they put me in lessons when I was 4 or 5. They let me try other things as well besides music.


 

Kris Bowers ''Wake the Neighbors'' live 2014

 

   I like keyboards for the simple fact that they are unique. They call a piano its own orchestra. With keyboards you have the range. You can play chords, melody, rhythm, all at once.

   Music is everything. It’s how we connect, both to each other and to our own emotions. Music reminds you of certain times and gives you a feeling instantly.


Kris Bowers

 

   Currently I’m touring with Julia Easterlin. We are doing concerts as a duo, and I’m excited about it. It’s just the two of us, and we experiment a lot on stage, with loops among other things, creating tracks on the spot.

   During the rest of the year I will be travelling and working on a couple of projects. I am starting my next album, and I’m making the music for a documentary about Kobe Bryant. A friend of mine is part of the production team, so that is how I got involved in this. And I love making music for television and film, so I enjoy doing this project.

 

Kris Bowers' record ''Heroes + Misfits'' (2014)

 


Kris Bowers was born in Los Angeles in 1989. He studied classical piano and jazz before he relocated to New York. He has earned undergraduate- and Master's degrees in jazz performance at Juilliard. He won first prize in the Thelonius Monk International Jazz Piano Competition, and appeared on Kanye West and Jay-Z's album ''Watch the Throne''. In 2014 he released his debut album ''Heroes + Misfits'' on Concord. Find out more HERE.

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Kelvin Sholar: Interview



Kelvin Sholar

 

Kelvin Sholar:

Above and Below

the Continuum

 

 

The Kelvin Sholar Interview part 1

Kelvin Sholar Group feat Esther Ambrosino: Blue-Indigo

 

The Kelvin Sholar Interview part 2

Kelvin Sholar Solo Michela "Orange" Kelvin Sholar Group Kalavan Suite

The Kelvin Sholar Interview part 3 


Kelvin Sholar Group feat. Wendell Harrison- "Tons"

The Kelvin Sholar Interview part 4

"Orange Yellow" New Detroit Kelvin Sholar


The Kelvin Sholar Interview part 5

 

 


Kelvin Sholar is an award-winning and Grammy-nominated pianist, composer, producer and writer, who has collaborated with a long list of greats, bringing cutting edge ideas to boundary-crossing music. He appears on countless recordings, has written music for films, and given masterclasses all over the world. Originally from Detroit Sholar is currently based in Berlin. Find out more HERE

 

Sadiq Bey is a poet, performance artist, percussionist and composer. Bey is originally from Detroit and is now based in Berlin, where he releases music as >green_man/ and schwartzegeist. Find out more HERE

 

The music in the interview is ''Continuum'' from the Kelvin Sholar recording Between Worlds.

 

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Singer-songwriter Ben Caplan: - I piss music

An article with Ben Caplan

Ben Caplan

An article with Ben Caplan


I would not say that there is one specific thing that I want to communicate to people who like to listen to music. There are many things to say, and many ways to say them. For me, music is one of the most diverse mediums that we can communicate with.
 
In poetry or prosaic writing, the artist can play with many styles, but usually must commit to one genre if the artist is to produce one coherent work. The poet must choose one language, and limit themselves to those who speak or understand that language (though there are some great exceptions, like T.S. Elliot). The same is true of theatre and film. In music, yes, we must pick one language for lyrics (though there are some great exceptions, like Regina Spektor) but there is a vast world of musical dialects and tonal languages that the composer can play with. The timbres of instruments, from vibraphones to zithers or any guitar imaginable, each provide a unique voice and story.
Melodies and rhythms from different cultures and times can be blended.

There is so much space to be creative. There are so many stories to tell. There are so many voices to tell them with, and the language of each voice can be blended in harmony.
 


In my own writing, I try to communicate many things, but I suppose in the end, I lean heavily on what I consider the only two subjects of true universal significance: love and death. But there are many paths we make take to and from love. There are many roads we may travel to and from death. There are many stops along the way.
 
I encourage people who love listening to music to branch out beyond their normal boundaries. There are no excuses these days. The resources are unlimited. Go listen to music you don't understand.

Listen to music you don't like. If you don't like it, try to articulate why. Do you hate Hungarian zither music? Try to explain why. Do you hate Justin Bieber? Try to explain what it is about the music that you dislike. By developing the skill to articulate what you don't like, you can help to deepen your appreciation for the things you do like.



Music to me is like water. It sustains me. I need to sip from it every so often or I feel faint. I need to bath in it to keep my soul clean.
It flows over me. It does not flow out of me like a constant river, but if I drink enough of it, it comes back out. I sweat it out.
 
I piss music. It often stinks, and I flush most of it away, but it's always a relief to get it out.

Ben Caplan



Canadian multi-instrumentalist (guitar, banjo, keyboards) and diverse singer-songwriter Ben Caplan performs with and without his band The Casuel Smokers. He has released the critically acclaimed album In The Time Of The Great Remembering. Find out more HERE.



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Cory Henry on his latest project

Cory Henry writes about his latest project

Cory Henry


   My name is Cory Henry. I'm preparing for the release of my first organ solo project. This project is a special one for me, as it features songs that I grew up on from church as well as two songs that I wrote. I thought I would give it a shot, and therefore decided to do a solo record like piano players of the past. But in doing that, I wanted to find a way to be innovative and present a new sound and present the organ in the different light. I feel that the Hammond organ doesn't get its  justice in pop music and mainstream music. The legends of the instrument like Jimmy Smith, Joey D Francesco, and Billy Preston have brought the sound a long way. I really believe that this organ project is going to be informative and innovative. Unlike any other solo project ever heard. Every sound you hear is from a real hammond B3 . I recorded this record all in one night and all one takes. Mistakes and all this project is authentically me. This record is not for just musicians but it gives everyone something listen to whether they’re cleaning their house, driving to work,  are on the way to a jazz club, or even to church on Sunday morning. My hope is that this record will inspire people to think outside of the box and to perfect their craft so that they can share their gift with the world.

Cory Henry


Cory Henry on another organ recently.

Cory Henry with Snarky Puppy in 2013



Cory Henry has previously contributed to Musicians' Corner with this text: BORN WITH THE GIFT OF MUSIC

Cory Henry is a multi-instrumentalist and producer. His primary instrument is the organ, and he began playing at the age of two. At the age of six he competed at the Apollo Theatre and made it to the finalist round. Since his teens the list of the people that Mr. Henry has worked with has grown at a breath-taking pace. It includes Yolanda Adams, Sara Bareilles, Stanley Brown, Ray Chew And The Crew, P. Diddy, Kirk Franklin, Kenny Garrett, Rob Glasper, Ron Grant, Lalah Hathway, Derrick Hodge, Israel Houghton, Joe, Shaun Kingston, Donald Lawrence, Mary Mary, Donnie McClurkin, Michael McDonald, Boyz 2 Men, NAS, Snarky Puppy, Tommy Sims, Bruce Springsteen, The Roots, Hezekiah Walker, Bishop Jeffrey White, Betty Wright, and Timothy Wright.Listen to Cory Henry's solo work HERE.

Cory A. Henry -- Born with the gift of music

A text by Cory Henry


A text by Cory Henry. 

Cory Henry then


It is very possible to be born with the gift of music. You see the evidence of this every time you witness a child prodigy. I don’t know if there is a prerequisite that determines who has a this innate gift or not. For instance, do your parents need to be musically gifted or does the gift have to run in your bloodline? Many people discover the gift at an early age and they cultivate that gift in school. Being born with the gift of music is a bit of a broad question to answer. The flip side of everything that I said would be those people who have been born into musical families and are surrounded by musical people, but are not musically inclined. There is no right or wrong answer. It’s also possible for people who aren’t born with music to spend time and develop the gift of music. At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter how you acquire a gift, as long as you have the gift. 

- cory a. henry


Cory Henry now



Cory Henry is a multi-instrumentalist and producer. His primary instrument is the organ, and he began playing at the age of two. At the age of six he competed at the Apollo Theatre and made it to the finalist round. Since his teens the list of the people that Mr. Henry has worked with has grown at a breath-taking pace. It includes Yolanda Adams, Sara Bareilles, Stanley Brown, Ray Chew And The Crew, P. Diddy, Kirk Franklin, Kenny Garrett, Rob Glasper, Ron Grant, Lalah Hathway, Derrick Hodge, Israel Houghton, Joe, Shaun Kingston, Donald Lawrence, Mary Mary, Donnie McClurkin, Michael McDonald, Boyz 2 Men, NAS, Snarky Puppy, Tommy Sims, Bruce Springsteen, The Roots, Hezekiah Walker, Bishop Jeffrey White, Betty Wright, and Timothy Wright. This virtuoso leaves the audiences speechless with his solos. Listen to Cory Henry's solo work HERE.