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Kent Beatty shares his plans!


Kent Beatty

Photo Tom Roelofs


This time of the year is usually busy for musicians. Here in the USA, as well as in Europe, festivals seem to happen every week from April to August. It makes sense that people stayed in for the winter and are ready to get out in the sun! New Orleans Jazz Fest and Festival International de Louisiane are two big festivals that just finished here in the gulf coast region. And Hangout Fest just happened too. It’s my personal favorite, because it’s the only festival I’ve been to that’s on a beach!


After NAMM in January and a calm February, I worked with 6 bands in 2 months. A lot of time goes into balancing each band’s schedules and rehearsals. At Festival International in April, I played with 2 bands on the weekend, after staying awake the night before to do 2 early morning news (04:30 & 05:30) TV performances. I slept before that evening’s show and the festival weekend was a success.


I’m currently touring with the artist Brother Dege, pronounced like, “Brother Deedj”. In Europe, the band is known as Brother Dege & The Brotherhood, while in America, we are known as Brother Dege & The Brethren. It’s an interesting translation artifact.


Our latest album, Farmer’s Almanac, was released in 2018 along with several music videos. We toured across Europe & USA playing the new music, and 2019 saw the release of the deluxe edition vinyl. We are excited to return to Europe for two festivals in Switzerland this summer and a full tour later in October. I’m personally excited to return to Lucerne, one of the first places I ever visited in Europe, and where Keb’ Mo’ will be playing on the same festival date as us. That will be the third time I’ve played a festival date next to Keb’ Mo’! He’s one of my favorite blues artists, and I hope we’ll have time to watch their show. He and his band are just incredible.




Brother Dege "Country Come to Town" off the album Farmer's Almanac



KENT BEATTY is a successful and busy bassist for hire, as well as a member of Brother Dege & The Brethren, who are doing very well with their recordings and performances. 


Kent has previously contributed several articles to this platform. Enjoy one of them HERE


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Ruth Saxelby received the Music Journalist of the Year-award

Article in the section Articles about the Music Journalist of the Year award

Music journalist of the year Ruth Saxelby

The Music Journalist of the Year 2015 is Ruth Saxelby.

Earlier in the year Musicians' Corners' artist-jury elected Saxelby, currently at The Fader, as the recipient based on your nominations.

And yesterday Ruth Saxelby received her much deserved award in New York.

Singer Emma Larsson presented the award.

The artist jury's motivation for awarding Saxelby's journalistic work is:


Ruth Saxelby is our choice. We have done many interviews, and questions can occasionally feel contrived. Saxelby's approach to questioning artists keeps the interest of the reader, while moving the subject matter in a cohesive manner.  As performance artists ourselves, we appreciate her insight and attention to the topic. It was refreshing to read about subjects we don't often read about, such as the inspiration of a film composer. Saxelby is a talented writer, and we hope that she will have many years of unique and insightful journalism.


The artist-jury for the award this year are Kent Beatty, Will Calhoun and Mfa Kera.


This was Musicians' Corner's second annual Music Journalist of the Year-award. In 2015 it first went to Derek Walmsley.

The importance of quality music journalism can't be overestimated, and we very much want to acknowledge it here at Musicians' Corner. We look forward to following Ruth Saxelby's work in the coming years.



Ruth Saxelby: http://www.thefader.com/contributor_hub/ruth-saxelby

Emma Larsson: http://www.emmalarsson.com/

Kent Beatty: http://www.kentbeatty.com/

Will Calhoun: http://www.willcalhoun.com/

Mfa Kera: http://www.blackheritage.de/

The Music Journalist of the Year-award for 2014: http://www.musicians-corner.net/Derek-Walmsley-received-The-Music-Journalist-of-the-Year-award/

The Music Journalist of the Year-award: http://www.musicians-corner.net/category/presentation/

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The Music Journalist of the Year 2015 is Ruth Saxelby!

Article in the section Articles about the Music Journalist of the Year award

logo for the Music Journalist of the Year award on Musicians' Corner



   We are proud to announce that the recipient of The Music Journalist of the Year-award for 2015 is Ruth Saxelby.

   Ruth Saxelby is managing editor at The Fader, and has also contributed her journalistic skills at Pitchfork, The Guardian, Dummy, and Dazed & Confused.

   Among the excellent articles that Saxelby produced during the previous year you find examples such as these:


Techno Pioneer Derrick May Is Ready For Detroit To Get Its On-Screen Dues

In Conversation With The All-Knowing Ryuichi Sakamoto


   Musicians Corners' artist jury's motivation for awarding Ruth Saxelby with the title Music Journalist of the Year:


Ruth Saxelby is our choice. We have done many interviews, and questions can occasionally feel contrived. Saxelby's approach to questioning artists keeps the interest of the reader, while moving the subject matter in a cohesive manner.  As performance artists ourselves, we appreciate her insight and attention to the topic. It was refreshing to read about subjects we don't often read about, such as the inspiration of a film composer. Saxelby is a talented writer, and we hope that she will have many years of unique and insightful journalism.


   The artist jury for this year's award were Kent Beatty, Will Calhoun and Mfa Kera.

   The annual Music Journalist of the Year-award was first presented in 2015.

  



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Kent Beatty heads out on the roads of Europe


 

Kent Beatty

An article with Kent Beatty


   I’m on my way to Europe again for a fall tour. This time I’m playing with Brother Dege, who’s based in New Orleans, and whose music you may have heard in Quentin Tarantino’s film, "Django Unchained". I have known Brother Dege for four years, and played with him since the summer. For the European tour we’re a core line-up of four musicians.


   It’s amazing how much work goes into a tour. Scheduling, flights, hotels, trains, tour managers, music equipment, and many more things have to be planned in advance. In a previous piece for Musicians’ Corner, I wrote that you can’t have pets if you’re a traveling musician, or it's at least difficult. But this year, I took in a homeless cat. He had nowhere to go, and he reminded me of my cat I had as a young boy. So that is another thing you must plan for a tour, somebody must care for your loved ones when you are not there. 



Brother Dege "Too Old To Die Young"


   You accept the traveler lifestyle on the road, and you’re a nomad for a few months. You don’t have a home but you create one where you go. In the end, I’m excited to go home. I love to travel, but I love the home life around friends and family, too. I am lucky to live in a great music city, Lafayette, Louisiana, where I can continue to work and be closer to home (as well as New Orleans, Houston, and other nearby cities). 

   Touring has been made easier with technology. Booking travel is easier, and that includes finding good restaurants in the cities where we are playing. Apps, such as Yelp (currently), become your friend. On the money side, many costs have gone up, such as insurance and cost of living. However, musicians are not getting paid more. We still get paid the same as 10 years ago (or less in some touristy cities), so you must appreciate that you are paid to do what you love, as many artists do. The trade off is the experiences, traveling to places that many people would only see on holiday. 

   I like England and Holland for example. Of course, everything is in English in England, so it's easy for Americans to get around there. The crowds are often more responsive in Europe than in the States, and artists are at times treated better there than back home. We really don’t have a lot of spare time on the road, but if there is some, I enjoy doing something local and touristy. Going to a place like Rome is just incredible. Seeing all of the old buildings all over Europe, when you’re from the US (where almost nothing is older than 200 years), is amazing. And I also love the fries and mayo-thing that they do in France, Belgium, and Holland! Being from Louisiana, I love food, and I enjoy the things that we can't find in the USA. It's honestly one of my favorite parts of traveling.


Kent Beatty solo live



   I often play with a different band every week at home. The gigs aren't every night, but weekends are the busiest times for musicians. This means that I’m constantly learning other people’s music. 

   I’m still a technology fan, and Windows 10 is my software of choice. It unifies every device. While Apple has done wonders for making computers easy for everybody, I've always been a computer geek. I use all types of devices and OS. It’s a wonderful world in tech right now and it’s only getting better. I understand the older generations can shy away from computers, and many long for the golden days of live music and performing. You have to remember all the positives with technology. For example, how many artists who have been discovered through YouTube? Even if 99% of modern music is recorded with click-track, etc., people are still going to play instruments for the next 200+ years (I hope). As long as there is wood for guitars. A piano may be on a touch screen, but it’s still a piano.

I’m also excited about my new bass guitar! It’s a Muckelroy Bass. Brady Muckelroy is an incredible bassist turned bass luthier, and he makes handmade basses out of Austin/San Marcos, Texas. We have been friends for a long time and played shows together. I like all my basses, but you know, you might have a sound in your head that you’re aiming for, and this bass is the closest I’ve gotten to that. Brady does anything you want done with your bass, and no instrument leaves his shop until it sounds and feels the way he wants it. In addition to the bass, I am blessed to recently have my first string endorsement with my favorite brand, Elixir Strings

The south is really happening at the moment, and you can quote the great bassist Steve Bailey, who will tell you, ‘’All roads lead to Nashville’’. I even had a cameo in the new "Jurassic World" film, since many scenes were shot in New Orleans. I never truly appreciated this part of the world until I left. The south, and Louisiana in particular, really is a special place.


 

Basses belonging to Kent Beatty


Upcoming Tour-dates with Brother Dege & The Brotherhood:


Thurs 11/5/15 - DB's  (Utrecht, Netherlands)

 

Fri 11/6/15 - Zwarte Ruiter  (Den Haag, Netherlands)

 

Sat 11/7/15 - Strudelfest  (Amsterdam/Hoofddorp, Netherlands)

 

Sun 11/8/15 - Tam Tam (Deurne, Netherlands)

 

Tues 11/10/15 - Volt  (Sittard, Netherlands)

 

Thurs 11/12/15 - Jubez  (Karlsruhe, Germany)

 

Fri 11/13/15 - Kult-AG (Marsberg, Germany)

 

Sat 11/14/15 - Burgerhaus (Garching, Germany)

 

Sun 11/15/15 - Textilmuseum  (Helmbrechts, Germany)

 

Mon 11/16/15 - BASF Gesellschaftshaus  (Ludwigshafen, Germany)

 

Tues 11/17/15 - Kulturkeller  (Fulda, Germany)

 

Wed 11/18/15 - Downtown Bluesclub  (Hamburg, Germany)

 

Thurs 11/19/15 - Pumpwerk  (Wilhelmshaven, Germany)

 

Fri 11/20/15 - Blues Garage  (Isernhagen, Germany)

 

Sat 11/21/15 - Mensa der KGS  (Neustadt am Rübenberge, Germany)

 

Sun 11/22/15 - Pferdestall  (Bremerhaven, Germany)

 

Tues 11/24/15 - Internationales Gitarrenfestival (Bad Aibling, Germany)

 

Thurs 11/26/15 - Englische Kirche  (Bad Homburg, Germany)

 

Fri 11/27/15 - Bluesfestival, Opderschmelz  (L-Dudelange, Germany)

 

Sat 11/28/15 - Alte Seminarturnhalle (Nagold, Germany)




Kent Beatty has previously contributed to Musicians' Corner. Read more HERE.



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Kent Beatty looks back and ahead at the turn of the year

Kent Beatty

Some of the music that caught my ear in 2014: A friend got me into Bernard Wright's "'Nard" album, which is definitely not 2014, but that is one funky album! After playing several country shows this year, I became a Lady Antebellum fan. Another friend showed me the amazing Chris Thile, his solo performances blew my mind. As for new releases, "Supermodel" by Foster the People, Coldplay's "Ghost Stories", "Harlequin Dream" by Boy & Bear, and "Monuments to an Elegy" by The Smashing Pumpkins. Nothing More released a great self-titled album (congrats!), and my favorite release of 2014 was probably "Freeman" (also self-titled - I'm a huge Ween fan and Freeman is part Ween). I'm leaving out a bunch of pop singles. Has "All About That Bass" not caught anyone's ear?

 

The artists whom we lost during the year whom I will miss are Jack Bruce from Cream; Wayne Static from Static-X; and Johnny Winter.

 

Kent Beatty with a solo bass-clip for the season ''Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas''

 

 

With release dates changing, it's hard to say what I'm looking foreard to in 2015. Metallica's latest album should surface. For me personally, releases from new rock band Fight Night Anarchist and playing live with them, new solo songs, the NAMM show in January, playing at Festival International in April, and possibly more bass bashes.

 

 

Kent Beatty's hot band Fight Night Anarchist ''Omega Collide'' 2014. With Glen Mclain and Joey Cavallier.

 


Kent Beatty works as a touring bassist, and is known for his work with Hamilton Loomis. He performs at bass events, clinics, and is currently recording with his upcoming alt-metal band Fight Night Anarchist. Find out more HERE.

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10 artists on the changes and current times in the industry


logo for Musicians' Corner, Musicians On Music

  

  We are celebrating our first birthday here at Musicians’ Corner. This site, where musicians talk and write about music, opened at the turn of the month October-November last year. At that point the site was empty. But now…

 

  So many things have been said about music, as an art form, a soundtrack to our lives, a profession and career, as a reflection of us as people and a reflection of the times, and as an industry and a business, over this period of time. Many of our contributors have also addressed the same things, the changes in the business being one of the topics that many have spoken of, for example.

 


  Today we recap some of what has been said about the current times in music from an infrastructural point of view. Music has gone through so many changes lately in that regard.

 

 


Kent Beatty

KENT BEATTY: -It's a great time to be a musician. Some might disagree with that, in this age of TV Voice/Idol contests and live bands being replaced by machines all the time. Sure, record deals aren't being served up on the hood of a Ferrari often these days. But now there is so much that artists can do independently, if they are willing to put some work into it. Technology is a double-edged sword. More things to keep up with and manage, but most of the time, it is a musician's best friend. Imagine a tour without GPS. YouTube (and many others) allows anyone's music to be heard across the world, for free. And social media is far more effective than posting fliers around town. We take these useful tools for granted, some of which didn't even exist 10 years ago.

 


Bryan Beller

BRYAN BELLER: -Being totally open for communication 24/7/365 in this social media day and age has its pluses and minuses. I personally think it's a net positive to be able to have direct access to fans and vice versa - it can strengthen the bond between you and those who follow you, and it enables an artist to be much clearer about who they really are in "public". I've been online and available for public e-mail since 1995, and for many years I made a point to respond to *every* *single* *communication* that came my way. Nowadays that's just not possible anymore, because of the sheer volume of responses from Facebook, Twitter, and e-mail, for which I'm grateful - but I still try. That said, it can be a hindrance to the essential practice of isolation required for creativity. It's pretty hard to grow as a composer and a player when you're just writing e-mails all the time. So I think I'm finding a balance, and everyone needs to find their own.

 


Sadiq Bey

SADIQ BEY: -Today the industry of music is in total disarray. And working musicians are professionals, so it’s a job.
There is something I call truth to ownership, against truth to power. Everybody is owned in music, in sports, in Hollywood. They make magic wands out of holly wood, ya know? And it’s about bucking and bowing to get jobs. If you don’t make your own label you’re screwed.

 


Jean-Paul Bourelly

JEAN-PAUL BOURELLY: -The music business crashed with 9/11. We have been building it back up, to keep the creative minded audience in tune with us and music has still evolved.

 

 

Lige Curry

LIGE CURRY: -I want to say to young musicians that they need to educate themselves. These days you can google any question. This is no joke. Some business deals are good, some business deals are bad. When you don’t update yourself you will find yourself in hot water. But try to keep a positive attitude. A lot of people can’t handle it. You have to treat the business side in a way so that it doesn’t take you out.

 


Jan Kincaid

JAN KINCAID: -The business has changed so much over the years. The people who have survived are the people who have changed with it.

We have to look at new ways of doing our work. You are in charge of your own destiny much more now than you were before. It also means that you have to be careful where you spend your money.

We came up in the traditional way, through the live-scene and through people who wanted to invest in us. Now acts are molded to suit a certain age group. But then records cost less to make. For the people who grow up with this, for the 19-year olds now, the new way is what’s natural. We have been young enough to go with the changes. If we were ten years older I think that we would have been struggling. 

 

 
Oz Noy

OZ NOY: - The music business crashed, and the same thing happened in New York too. It hit the city hard. New York is still the jazz center of the world, but the scene has changed. A lot of clubs have closed. And now it’s a pretty set reality. There is still good music, but a lot less of it in a lot less places. The only thing that got bigger is the Broadway shows. That’s great for Broadway but it’s not great for real music in my opinion cause Broadway is not music , its theater.



Andrew Steen

ANDREW STEEN: - The benefit of the major label-system was purely financial. They had time and effort to put into albums because there was money. The people contributing to a Pledge campaign want a return on their investment even if it's small. The majors wanted things to sell. People didn't represent themselves very well in that. You can release your home made music now and be judged on your own merit.

 

 
T.M. Stevens

TM STEVENS: -Everything is machines, and it has really hurt the business, and hurt artists who play and have studied, and that’s what I have done all my entire career. But the answer to this is you don’t follow that and give up. Never give up. This is for the young people. Listen to me. Do not give up. Whatever it is that you believe in, whatever it is that you feel, follow your dreams and your dreams will follow you. – And I particularly believe that we will get our business back.

 

 
Niko Stoessl

NIKO STOESSL: -I think that everything’s getting better though and that the music business will restructure itself again eventually, creating new sources of income for musicians who are willing to move forward.

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Kent Beatty talks about technology, touring, and transition

An article with Kent Beatty

Kent Beatty

An article with Kent Beatty



It's a great time to be a musician. Some might disagree with that, in this age of TV Voice/Idol contests and live bands being replaced by machines all the time. Sure, record deals aren't being served up on the hood of a Ferrari often these days. But now there is so much that artists can do independently, if they are willing to put some work into it. Technology is a double-edged sword. More things to keep up with and manage, but most of the time, it is a musician's best friend. Imagine a tour without GPS. YouTube (and many others) allows anyone's music to be heard across the world, for free. And social media is far more effective than posting fliers around town. We take these useful tools for granted, some of which didn't even exist 10 years ago. 


Kent Beatty bass solo with Hamilton Loomis Band.

 

I often compare life on tour to the movie The Matrix. Neo is presented with a red pill and a blue pill. One allows him to continue his normal life, the other takes him farther down the rabbit hole. Touring is a crazy lifestyle. It allows you to live your dreams and opens many doors. You make friends from around the world! What you sacrifice is everyday life events. I have friends whose babies I haven't met yet, and weddings, concerts, and trips are frequently missed. No pets, and relationships can be a challenge. That said, I wouldn't trade my experiences for anything, and it makes you appreciate home and family that much more. Being from Louisiana, I appreciate the food more too!

 

Kent Beatty behind his bass




Transitions can be scary, but with great risk comes great reward. I'll never forget deciding to quit my job to play music full time. After 5 years on the road with Hamilton Loomis Band, I've transitioned more into a solo artist, as well as continuing to be a touring bassist (two very different things!). I've become a sort of "hired gun" between bass events. It keeps me on my toes and sometimes you have to do gigs cold with no rehearsal. I've always been more of a band bassist, fortunate to have an identity in whichever band I'm with. Funny bass player jokes aside, we have it pretty good. The solo bass community is full of some of the nicest, good-hearted people I've ever known. Some of my solo compositions are on YouTube, and I'm working on compiling my songs into an album. I recently performed during NAMM in Anaheim and now I'm recording with an alt-metal band.


Kent Beatty solo bass composition ''Image''.

 

I've grown to appreciate all types of music. I was lucky to grow up with everything from classical to metal. I love music for the sake of its beauty and what's right for the song. I don't get hung up on which genres are "cool" or not anymore, I just love playing bass. This is an area where spirituality helped me to grow. You might see me with a country band one week, and then hear my original projects and wonder if I'm even the same person. Versatility goes a long way, and if you really love music, you'll find something to like about things you may have not liked before. There are songs I love now that I wouldn't have considered years ago. Whatever I'm playing, I'll always be a rocker at heart. 


Kent Beatty

Kent Beatty's bass set up from DVD 



It's helpful to realize your strengths and weaknesses. There will always be someone who can out shred you, new players pop up every day. Just go down Broadway in Nashville any night of the week. Of course, try to improve what you aren't so good at. But realize what makes your style unique and what you have to offer. For me, that has been one of the most liberating thought processes. There are few musicians who are good at everything, so try to be good at being you. And most of the time, you won't be getting paid for your shredding.


-Kent Beatty


''No No No'' live in Belgium with Hamilton Loomis.


''The Instrumental'', original song by Jared Daigle and Kent Beatty.



Kent Beatty works as a touring bassist, and is known for his work with Hamilton Loomis. He performs at bass events, clinics, and is currently recording with upcoming alt-metal band Fight Night Anarchist on their debut album. Find out more HERE.