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The top 15 most liked articles on Musicians' Corner - to date !

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Find out which articles were the most popular to date



  
Here at Musicians' Corner we normally keep the "Like"-buttons static. But they are getting a lot of clicks, and today it is time to lift the veil on the 15 articles that got the most clicks to date! David Murray remembering Butch Morris made the list. Check out which other articles did! And we really want to thank our readers for your many visits and your awesome music-love!




15. MONICA BORRFORS











14. PAUL JOSEPH











13. ZAM JOHNSON











12. MOTOSHI KOSAKO









11. KENNETH MEREDITH










10. YUVAL AVITAL









9. BRIA SKONBERG










8. DAVID MURRAY REMEMBERS BUTCH MORRIS










7. BEN CAPLAN








6. BOB HEMENGER










5. TITO PUENTE JR









4. CHRIS SIMMONS










3. BRYAN BELLER









2. LIGE CURRY









1. SARAH LONGFIELD










The story continues...!

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10 artists on the changes and current times in the industry


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  We are celebrating our first birthday here at Musicians’ Corner. This site, where musicians talk and write about music, opened at the turn of the month October-November last year. At that point the site was empty. But now…

 

  So many things have been said about music, as an art form, a soundtrack to our lives, a profession and career, as a reflection of us as people and a reflection of the times, and as an industry and a business, over this period of time. Many of our contributors have also addressed the same things, the changes in the business being one of the topics that many have spoken of, for example.

 


  Today we recap some of what has been said about the current times in music from an infrastructural point of view. Music has gone through so many changes lately in that regard.

 

 


Kent Beatty

KENT BEATTY: -It's a great time to be a musician. Some might disagree with that, in this age of TV Voice/Idol contests and live bands being replaced by machines all the time. Sure, record deals aren't being served up on the hood of a Ferrari often these days. But now there is so much that artists can do independently, if they are willing to put some work into it. Technology is a double-edged sword. More things to keep up with and manage, but most of the time, it is a musician's best friend. Imagine a tour without GPS. YouTube (and many others) allows anyone's music to be heard across the world, for free. And social media is far more effective than posting fliers around town. We take these useful tools for granted, some of which didn't even exist 10 years ago.

 


Bryan Beller

BRYAN BELLER: -Being totally open for communication 24/7/365 in this social media day and age has its pluses and minuses. I personally think it's a net positive to be able to have direct access to fans and vice versa - it can strengthen the bond between you and those who follow you, and it enables an artist to be much clearer about who they really are in "public". I've been online and available for public e-mail since 1995, and for many years I made a point to respond to *every* *single* *communication* that came my way. Nowadays that's just not possible anymore, because of the sheer volume of responses from Facebook, Twitter, and e-mail, for which I'm grateful - but I still try. That said, it can be a hindrance to the essential practice of isolation required for creativity. It's pretty hard to grow as a composer and a player when you're just writing e-mails all the time. So I think I'm finding a balance, and everyone needs to find their own.

 


Sadiq Bey

SADIQ BEY: -Today the industry of music is in total disarray. And working musicians are professionals, so it’s a job.
There is something I call truth to ownership, against truth to power. Everybody is owned in music, in sports, in Hollywood. They make magic wands out of holly wood, ya know? And it’s about bucking and bowing to get jobs. If you don’t make your own label you’re screwed.

 


Jean-Paul Bourelly

JEAN-PAUL BOURELLY: -The music business crashed with 9/11. We have been building it back up, to keep the creative minded audience in tune with us and music has still evolved.

 

 

Lige Curry

LIGE CURRY: -I want to say to young musicians that they need to educate themselves. These days you can google any question. This is no joke. Some business deals are good, some business deals are bad. When you don’t update yourself you will find yourself in hot water. But try to keep a positive attitude. A lot of people can’t handle it. You have to treat the business side in a way so that it doesn’t take you out.

 


Jan Kincaid

JAN KINCAID: -The business has changed so much over the years. The people who have survived are the people who have changed with it.

We have to look at new ways of doing our work. You are in charge of your own destiny much more now than you were before. It also means that you have to be careful where you spend your money.

We came up in the traditional way, through the live-scene and through people who wanted to invest in us. Now acts are molded to suit a certain age group. But then records cost less to make. For the people who grow up with this, for the 19-year olds now, the new way is what’s natural. We have been young enough to go with the changes. If we were ten years older I think that we would have been struggling. 

 

 
Oz Noy

OZ NOY: - The music business crashed, and the same thing happened in New York too. It hit the city hard. New York is still the jazz center of the world, but the scene has changed. A lot of clubs have closed. And now it’s a pretty set reality. There is still good music, but a lot less of it in a lot less places. The only thing that got bigger is the Broadway shows. That’s great for Broadway but it’s not great for real music in my opinion cause Broadway is not music , its theater.



Andrew Steen

ANDREW STEEN: - The benefit of the major label-system was purely financial. They had time and effort to put into albums because there was money. The people contributing to a Pledge campaign want a return on their investment even if it's small. The majors wanted things to sell. People didn't represent themselves very well in that. You can release your home made music now and be judged on your own merit.

 

 
T.M. Stevens

TM STEVENS: -Everything is machines, and it has really hurt the business, and hurt artists who play and have studied, and that’s what I have done all my entire career. But the answer to this is you don’t follow that and give up. Never give up. This is for the young people. Listen to me. Do not give up. Whatever it is that you believe in, whatever it is that you feel, follow your dreams and your dreams will follow you. – And I particularly believe that we will get our business back.

 

 
Niko Stoessl

NIKO STOESSL: -I think that everything’s getting better though and that the music business will restructure itself again eventually, creating new sources of income for musicians who are willing to move forward.

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What IS music?

 

 

 

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   We are getting close to our first birthday here at Musicians’ Corner. This site, where musicians talk and write about music, opened at the turn of the month October-November last year. At that point the site was empty. But now… In less than a year 44 artists have contributed 47 articles in text, audio and film to the site, Musicians’ Corner has acquired a formidable artist-editor in one of our sections, and shortly we are about to give an award out. It has been an interesting year!

  So many things have been said about music, as an art form, a soundtrack to our lives, a life changer, a profession and career, as a reflection of us as people and a reflection of the times, and as an industry and a business, over this period of time. Many of our contributors have also addressed the same things, the changes in the business being one of the topics that many have spoken of, for example.

 


 

  Today though we recap what has been said on another topic.

What is music to us?

What IS music? In the first place?

 

Find out what 13 of our artist contributors express concerning what music is to them.

 

 


Bryan Beller

 

BRYAN BELLER: - Music, to me is a sound. To be sure, there is melody, and harmony, and rhythm, and tone, but in the end a collection of musicians will have a collective sound, or what some have called "one note."

 


T.K. Blue

 

TK BLUE: - Music is spiritual nourishment for the soul. It’s a sacred art that brings all people together, regardless of race, religion, color, sex, or ethnic background.

 


Kris Bowers


KRIS BOWERS: - Music is everything. It’s how we connect, both to each other and to our own emotions. Music reminds you of certain times and gives you a feeling instantly.

 


Ben Caplan

 

BEN CAPLAN: - Music to me is like water. It sustains me. I need to sip from it every so often or I feel faint. I need to bath in it to keep my soul clean. It flows over me. It does not flow out of me like a constant river, but if I drink enough of it, it comes back out. I sweat it out. I piss music. It often stinks, and I flush most of it away, but it's always a relief to get it out.

 


Will Calhoun

 

WILL CALHOUN: - Music is life. It is the things you experience. Life, love, stress, magic moments, moments that go down the drain. It’s no different than life.  I hear music when I’m not playing. I feel life when I play.  Music and spirituality came together in my life. Perhaps I wasn’t aware of the music at first.

 


Lige Curry

 

LIGE CURRY: - Music is everything to me. My priorities are my health and my family, but music is my anchor. It keeps me rolling. It’s also a love/hate-thing. The love is the notes, the style, the art. The hate stems from the business side. It’s about how much you are worth.

 


Terence Higgins


TERENCE HIGGINS: - Music is everything to me. It consumes a lot of my time, I need it like I need air. There is not a day that goes by when I’m not involved in music one way or the other, be it as a working professional or as a listener. It’s life to me. And it has been like that every since I can remember.

 


Didier Lockwood

 

DIDIER LOCKWOOD: - Music is a way of life. It's something I need to expand myself and meet people and cultures. It's my transportation.

 


Makaya McCraven


MAKAYA McCRAVEN: - To me music embodies a wide range of areas. To me music is a social thing. It is a language, and I really believe in music as a language through events. It’s unspeakable emotion that we have a hard time describing in words. That is especially true for instrumental music. We can play music together across language barriers. Music is played at weddings, funerals, celebrations, parties -- to express what we can’t say through words.


Oz Noy

 

OZ NOY: - Music is like air really. A lot of us would be dead without it. Our soul will die! It sounds a bit dramatic but it’s true.


Chris Simmons

 

CHRIS SIMMONS: - Music is a necessary part of life to me, like air and water.  I love to hear it and I love to create it and perform it.

 


Mike Stern


MIKE STERN: - On a very serious side music is food for the soul. I don't know what the hell I would do without it. There are times when I don't want to hear anything. At other times I hear music in everything, in the wind, in the traffic, in people talking. And I hear music in how people talk in different places, in India, Japan and throughout the world.


Laura Stevenson

 

LAURA STEVENSON: - Music is the best way for me to communicate exactly how I feel.


 

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Bass virtuoso Bryan Beller from the Aristocrats+ visits

An article by Bryan Beller

Bryan Beller

     An article with Bryan Beller Photo Mike Mesker


- I would just say, as a general rule of thumb for music and work: Be authentic, and make sure to be comfortable with who you are as a person and a musician, because no matter how much money you make or don't make, or how much success you have or don't have, or anything else having to do with being a musician - "you" will always be there. So find a place in your being that works for you whether you're touring, or home, or teaching, or playing sometimes, or even just practicing. Practice being ok with who you are. In a lot of ways, that's the hardest thing to practice. Music, playing - that's the easy part, the fun part. Or, it *should* be. 


Bryan Beller with Steve Vai.


- My favorite moments are…when I'm doing a show and the monitor mix and the onstage sound is perfect (which is rare, but does happen occasionally), and the creativity and communication among the musicians is immediate and flowing naturally. When I've just completed a demo of a new song that somehow magically conveys exactly what I was trying to say. And when I'm in an educational environment and I'm able to get someone to get something they hadn't previously considered, and it leads to some kind of breakthrough in their playing, or even their lives. Those are really special moments, and I try and treasure them.


The Aristocrats

The Aristocrats: Guthrie Govan, Marco Minnemann & Bryan Beller.


- Being totally open for communication 24/7/365 in this social media day and age has its pluses and minuses. I personally think it's a net positive to be able to have direct access to fans and vice versa - it can strengthen the bond between you and those who follow you, and it enables an artist to be much clearer about who they really are in "public". I've been online and available for public e-mail since 1995, and for many years I made a point to respond to *every* *single* *communication* that came my way. Nowadays that's just not possible anymore, because of the sheer volume of responses from Facebook, Twitter, and e-mail, for which I'm grateful - but I still try. That said, it can be a hindrance to the essential practice of isolation required for creativity. It's pretty hard to grow as a composer and a player when you're just writing e-mails all the time. So I think I'm finding a balance, and everyone needs to find their own.


The Aristocrats live in 2012.


- Being in The Aristocrats is a wild ride, both musically and professionally! Musically: Playing with two masters like Guthrie Govan and Marco Minnemann pushes me to the absolute limit of what I can do on the instrument, which is a good thing. And it also allows me to not have to be the most technically insane bassist in the world, because Marco and Guthrie have that stuff covered. I'm there to provide the biggest possible sound and as much harmonic support as possible to fill out a trio that's fusion-oriented but rock in spirit, and step out only when needed - otherwise it will all sound like noise. So it's really a dream scenario for me. Professionally, it's been amazing to see instrumental music fans around the world embrace The Aristocrats so suddenly and warmly that we're somehow able to make records and tour the world without having our furniture repossessed. I wasn't sure it was possible unless I was going to be a sideman for someone else. But now we're making it work with a band that's all our own, and it's a great feeling. It's hard to describe how grateful I am for all of that.


Bryan Beller

                Photo T.J. Lambert


- Music, to me is a sound. To be sure, there is melody, and harmony, and rhythm, and tone, but in the end a collection of musicians will have a collective sound, or what some have called "one note." When I am a fan of a band or an artist, I am completely enthralled by their One Note. It's there no matter what song they're playing, and I either enjoy it or I don't. When I do, there's nothing like it.

Bryan Beller


Bryan Beller bass solo.



Bryan Beller is a bass guitarist, who for two decades now has been working with a long list of amazing musicians. Beller has also made solo albums since 2003. His current projects are The Aristocrats and Dethklok. Bryan Beller is a Berklee Collage of Music graduate who frequently teaches and has blogged about music since 1995. Find out more about The Aristocrats HERE and about Bryan Beller HERE.